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While tannin removal anion exchange resins are a popular way of removing tannin from your water supply, you need to realize that a tannin anion exchange system can use several hundred dollars a year in salt and waste up to 80 gallons of regenerating water every other day. You may need to replace the resin in 5 or 6 years. We think there is a better way.


Recently, a technology called charged membrane filtration (CMF) has proven to be highly effective at removing tannin from water supplies. The Better Water Warehouse system is truly "disruptive technology, " that is ready to displace the established technology and shake up the industry. The Disruptor Charged Membrane Filter System can remove the following contaminants:

Bacteria (99.8%)
Iron
Viruses (90-92%)
Copper
Cysts
Lead
Tannins
Chromium VI
Endotoxins (96%)
Selenium
Legeonella (99.9%)
Tannic Acid
Silica
Humic Acid
Heavy Metals
Cryptosporidium
Fulvic Acids

Charged membrane filtration is manufactured with Nano alumina fibers that have a zeta potential of 51 millivolts. A CMF cartridge retains bacteria, viruses, cryptosporidium oocysts, and even tannin because of this strong zeta potential. The electroabsorbative technology for water purification CMF media is engineered this 51 millivolt charge covers the entire volume and depth of the media.

Unlike mechanical filters that rely on pore size, the CMF technology literally secures the contaminant by absorbing it in a very real way. This allows for virtually zero pressure drop and high flow rates. If you compare the Disruptor CMF to ultrafiltration membranes, you will find dramatically higher flow rates with less pressure drop. The filters also have a long life and are easily replaceable.

The CMF media is manufactured from a naturally occurring element called boehmite, which has no known health side effects. In fact, boehmite has long been used as an additive to food products and digestive analgesics. Additionally, it has passed testing for NSF/ANSI Standard 42 and 61 for potable water and USP Class VI testing and endotoxin testing.

Overall, Better Water Warehouse recommends CMF over anion exchange softening due to cost and performance.


Continuous Membrane Filtration (CMF) is a water treatment technology that utilizes microfiltration / ultrafiltration membrane to achieve the removal of very small contaminants in water. A typical CMF system is made up of a membrane filtration unit and a membrane cleaning system.

4-6 Bathrooms

Tannin Water Treatment

Because there are a number of different tannins and types of humic acids, they can be very difficult to remove from water. Just because one treatment method for tannins in water works well in one location, that doesn't mean it will be effective a few miles away, where the vegetation may be different. Historically, styrene-based macroporous anion resin has been used to treat tannin water, but it doesn't always work. Acrylic-based resins have been used more recently and have produced better results. They are made with a macroporous structure that allows them to be regenerated more effectively.

Tannins in water

If your water looks more like dirty water than the clear, clean liquid that it should, you may have a problem with tannins in the water. The often brownish color of a cup of hot brown tea or a glass of cold iced tea comes from tannin, a biomolecule found in plants – including tea leaves. While this color and it is slightly bitter, the deniable taste may taste great in tea, it isn't very desirable in water. The color makes the water look dirty and can stain porcelain fixtures and laundry. Making them look brown.

Tannins are found in many types of vegetation, including nuts, tea, berries, and many types of trees. When those plants decompose in the soil, they easily leach into the water that flows through them, making their way into surface water and shallow wells. Along with the tannins are humic acid and fulvic acid, related "humic" substances – substances that are produced by decaying organic matter. All of these substances have a similar impact on the water, changing the color and making it taste and smell bitter. Exactly which humic acids and tannins in water are causing the problem will depend on the plants in a given area.

Removing Tannins from Well Water

How to Remove Tannins from Water

Tannin in Water removal is an application that some dealers have felt uncomfortable tackling.

We recommended that tannin water be treated by a water softener before being processed by a tannin removal system. The softener uses a cation media that removes hardness,  minerals, and some metals, both of which can have a negative impact on the anion resin used to remove tannins. The water softener uses an ion-exchange resin that attracts positively charged particles this will not have a negative impact on the tannins in the water.

Tannins have a slight negative charge, which is why they can be treated with anion resins, which attract negatively charged particles. In this specialty resin, the tannin ions are exchanged for chloride ions. Since the resin can't really distinguish between tannins in water and any other type of negatively charged particle, it will also remove these additional ions. This typically means that alkaline ions are removed, which can cause a corresponding decrease in the pH of the water. Once the capacity of the resin for these ions has been reached, the pH will go back to its original level. Nitrates are also frequently removed by this type of resin.

This anion resin is typically regenerated (meaning that the accumulated tannins are removed and new chloride ions are made available for the ion-exchange process) with salt, and the resin will generally be brined at 10 lbs per cubic foot. Most importantly, this regeneration should be performed every two to three days, which will reduce the likelihood of organic fouling. Tannins tend to migrate into the inner matrix of the anion resin. Once this occurs, it is very difficult to regenerate the tannins from the resin.

In many tanning treatment systems, the tannin resin is mixed with softening resin. This reduces the amount of space required by the equipment and lowers the cost of the equipment. This type of design is not ideal, however, since the mixing of the media can cause problems. Better Water WAREHOUSE does not recommend that cation and anion resin be mixed together in the same tank and recommends softening first, followed by a tannin removal system.

Suggested Retail $5725.00

The Problem with removing tannins from well water

Cleaning Methods for hardness forming on a water treatment equipment

Calcium carbonate precipitation can be cleaned with a weak acid. Citric or phosphoric acid will dissolve calcium carbonate precipitation. The unit and associated plumbing must be compatible with any cleaning agent. Most types of metal fouling can be treated in the same fashion.

When a tannin color passes through a unit that has previously worked properly, an attempt to clean the resin should be performed. Soda ash (Na2CO3) can be added to the brine to help clean the anion resin. Typically 0.5 to 1 pound of soda ash is added to the brine well. The soda ash will increase the pH of the brine causing the resin to swell to a greater degree. The swelling will make the pores slightly larger so more of the tannins can be eluted from the resin. Tannins also are more soluble at the higher pH, producing an environment to help strip the tannins from the resin. This cleaning procedure can produce a fishy odor. After the resin has been treated with soda ash a second regeneration should be performed to convert the resin completely to the chloride form.

If soda ash is unsuccessful in cleaning the resin, a chlorine treatment can be used as a last resort. Place approximately four to eight ounces of standard household bleach in the brine well. Place the system into regeneration. Once a chlorine odor is detected in the drain line, shut the system down for one to two hours. Finish the remainder of the regeneration cycle after the system has soaked. A second regeneration should be performed to remove any residual chlorine. This cleaning procedure is very hard on the resin and should be attempted as a last resort. Oxidants, such as chlorine, will attack and break down ion exchange resin. There is no ion exchange resin on the market that is chlorine resistant; there only are resins that are more chlorine tolerant. The tannin resins in the water treatment market today are relatively chlorine intolerant. If this treatment is unsuccessful, the replacement must be considered.

If the unit contains both cation and anion, regenerate the bed with salt before attempting any cleaning procedure. Any metals, like iron, will precipitate on the cation resin, due to high pH or oxidation.

1-3 Bathrooms

Better Water Model  TR-3

Oxidizing agents like chlorine are effective at breaking down organic compounds like tannins. A simple jar test will show the concentration and retention time required to oxidize tannins. An activated carbon unit following the retention tank will remove the chlorine and may adsorb other organic compounds in the water. Some types of activated carbon alone may reduce the tannins to acceptable levels. Consult Better Water Warehouse for the appropriate type of product. It should be noted that the reaction between chlorine and tannins might produce trihalomethane (THMs) which are carcinogens.

Reverse osmosis is another effective method for removing tannins. Since tannins are high molecular weight organics RO should reject them effectively. However, tannins will tend to foul the membrane in the system. It also is very expensive to properly install a whole house RO system to treat all of the water. Check with your local Better Water for more information.

America's #1  Water Purification Solution tannins

565 water softener

Tannin Removal Water Filter

What are Tannins in water?

Tannins can cause yellow water and yellow staining on fabrics and fixtures. Tannins measuring 0.5 PPM or higher may cause staining and/or interference with various water treatment processes.
Note: A Tannin filter will not remove or kill microorganisms that can contribute to water with higher turbidity levels. If these issues exist, please contact customer service.

The Better Water Tannin Filter and Softener

High capacity resin
Easy-to-program metered electronic head
Standard bypass included
Reduces tannins up to 10 PPM
90-day customer satisfaction guarantee
Limited lifetime manufacturer's warranty on tanks and parts (5 years on the electronic head)
18"x 33" round brine tank that holds 375 lbs. of salt
Removes plant tannins

Your water must have <2.0  ppm Iron. If you have more than that you will need to employ pretreatment for the iron beforehand by purchasing one of our Better Water Warehouse Whole House Iron Filter Systems.

Are Tannins Bad for you?  Or are Tannins Good for you?

So, to define tannins, They are found in leaf, root, bud, seed, and stem tissues. An example of the tannins' location in stem tissue is that they are often found in the growth areas of trees, such as the secondary phloem and xylem and the layer between the cortex and epidermis.  This is plant tannins. 


What are tannins in?
Found in many plants and often released into the soil and water when vegetation decomposes, tannins in water can be challenging to remove. Tannins may help regulate the growth of these tissues. These biomolecules give water a yellow or brownish tint and often taste bitter, but they are not a health risk. If you have tannins in your water, please contact us to help you learn more about this contaminant and ways to filter and remove it from the Certified Water Specialists at Better Water Warehouse Systems.


Tannins are an essential ingredient in the process of tanning leather.


Testimonial Tannin Water Filter Using The Better Water Warehouse  System
"Have to admit we were a bit unsure but figured we had nothing to lose, so we decided to try the Better Water Warehouse Filter System, and we are now tannin-free! I am happy! Thank you so much! I've attached our pics of our test run. 

Tannin water treatment

Removing Tannins from Well Water

Warranty Limited Lifetime

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Better Water Model  TR-6

CALL 855-909-9544 tannins

Water softener system

Suggested Retail $4200.00

How to Remove Tannins with an Ion-Exchange System

Sales Price $2380.00

hydrolysable tannins

Tannin Water Treatment

Warranty Limited Lifetime

Tannins in water are not a health concern. They have no direct effect on human health. Many of the foods that we eat every day contain various types of tannins, and they are added to a number of beverages for their color and taste. In water, however, they are very undesirable Mostly for the color of the water. So, there are no tannins side effects from water. There are also no plant tannins side effects.

A hydrolyzable tannin or pyrogallol-type tannin is a type of tannin that, on heating with hydrochloric or sulfuric acids, yields gallic or ellagic acids. Tannins, including Gallo and ellagic acid (epigallitannins), are inhibitors of HIV replication. Hydrolysable tannins can be extracted from different vegetable plants, such as chestnut wood.

In most cases, water treatment experts recommended that a water softener treat tannin water before being processed by a tannin removal system. The softener uses cation media to remove hardness minerals and some metals, both of which can negatively impact the anion resin used to remove tannins. The water softener uses an ion-exchange resin that attracts positively charged particles, so it won't impact the tannins in the water.
Tannins have a slight negative charge, which is why they can be treated with anion resins, which attract negatively charged particles. In this specialty resin, the tannin ions are exchanged for chloride ions. Since the resin can't distinguish between tannins in water and any other type of negatively charged particle, it will also remove these additional ions. This typically means that alkaline ions are removed, which can cause a corresponding decrease in the pH of the water. Once the resin's capacity for these ions has been reached, the pH will go back to its original level. Nitrates are also frequently removed by this type of resin.
Calcium carbonate precipitation can be cleaned with a weak acid. Citric or phosphoric acid will dissolve calcium carbonate precipitation. The unit and associated plumbing must be compatible with any cleaning agent. Most types of metal fouling can be treated in the same fashion.
If the unit contains both cation and anion, regenerate the bed with salt before attempting any cleaning procedure. Any metals, like Iron, will precipitate on the cation resin due to high pH or oxidation.



Oxidizing agents like chlorine are effective at breaking down organic compounds like tannins. A simple jar test will show the concentration and retention time required to oxidize tannins. Following the retention tank, an activated carbon unit will remove the chlorine and may adsorb other organic compounds in the water. Some types of activated carbon alone may reduce the tannins to acceptable levels. Consult Better Water Warehouse for the appropriate kind of product. It should be noted that the reaction between chlorine and tannins might produce trihalomethane (THMs), which are carcinogens.

The CMF media is manufactured from a naturally occurring element called boehmite, which has no known health side effects. In fact, boehmite has long been used as an additive to food products and digestive analgesics. Additionally, it has passed testing for NSF/ANSI Standard 42 and 61 for potable water and USP Class VI testing and endotoxin testing.
Overall, Better Water Warehouse recommends CMF over anion exchange softening due to cost and performance.
Continuous Membrane Filtration (CMF) is a water treatment technology that utilizes a microfiltration/ultrafiltration membrane to remove very small contaminants in water. A typical CMF system is made up of a membrane filtration unit and a membrane cleaning system.

Because there are several different tannins and types of humic acids, they can be complicated to remove from water. Just because one treatment method for tannins in water works well in one location, that doesn't mean it will be effective a few miles away, where the vegetation may be different. Historically, styrene-based macroporous anion resin has been used to treat tannin water, but it doesn't always work. Acrylic-based resins have been used more recently and have produced better results. They are made with a macroporous structure that allows them to be regenerated more effectively
Tannin resin is often mixed with softening resin, which reduces the amount of space required by the equipment and reduces the system's cost. This type of design has performed satisfactorily in many areas. However, during the regeneration, the salt will displace calcium from the cation resin and potentially alkalinity from the anion/tannin resin, promoting calcium carbonate precipitation. It can be seen as a white residue in the resin bed and a coating on the drain line. Pressure drop through the system or a milky-white substance in the backwash water are indicators of precipitation. If a small sample of the floc can be removed from the system and placed into some dilute hydrochloric acid (muriatic acid), the particle will bubble. The bubbling is due to the release of carbon dioxide. Cleaning methods will be discussed later.

Anion resin has a lower density than cation resin. When an anion resin is backwashed, it should not be backwashed at the same flow rate as a cation softening resin. The backwash flowrate of a cation is approximately five GPM/square foot (SF) of area. The anion should be backwashed at a flow rate of roughly two GPM/SF. If the tannin removal unit is a dual bed system (softening resin and tannin removal resin), the backwash must be adjusted, or an upper screen or basket should be used in the valve. This modification will prevent resin loss. What is an acceptable level of tannins in drinking water? None
Tannin resin is frequently associated with a fishy odor. A residual by-product of anion resin is an amine. The amine coming from the resin is generally in deficient concentrations. However, the odor threshold is approximately 40 parts per billion. Although the release of this amine is not a health issue, it is aesthetically displeasing. The fishy odor is more common when the water is chlorinated and has a high pH (>8). This is often the case when chloramines are used as a disinfectant. Ammonia and chlorine are mixed, causing an environment that will break down resin, and the ammonia will usually cause the pH to increase. It is best to remove any oxidant (chlorine, chloramine or peroxide, etc.) before the anion unit.
As water passes through a chloride-form anion resin, the resin will remove alkalinity from the water. Alkalinity is the buffering factor in water. As alkalinity is removed, the pH of the water will decrease. The anion resin has a limited capacity for alkalinity and should reduce the pH for only a short period of the service cycle. The chloride content of the treated water will increase. Check the local water treatment regulations for chloride limits, if any. Chlorides have a secondary drinking water standard of 250 ppm. If the TDS levels exceed 800 ppm in the influent water, chloride may detect a salty taste on the treated water. RO will be required to reduce the TDS and salty taste.
Tannins can cause yellow water and yellow staining on fabrics and fixtures. Tannins measuring 0.5 PPM or higher may cause staining and/or interference with various water treatment processes.
Note: A Tannin filter will not remove or kill microorganisms that can contribute to water with higher turbidity levels. If these issues exist, please contact customer service.


Your water must have <2.0 ppm Iron. If you have more than that, you will need to employ pretreatment for the Iron beforehand by purchasing one of our Better Water Warehouse Whole House Iron Filter Systems.
treating tannins in water with anion resins is the system's potential to develop a fishy odor. This is caused by trimethylamine (TMA), an organic compound used to make the resin. Under high pH conditions, the TMA (even in small concentrations) can produce this unpleasant smell, although it should dissipate relatively quickly. When the resin is made with the proper post-treatment, it will generally lose its odor within a regeneration or two. It should be noted that a macroporous anion resin will generally clean up faster and easier than gel-type anion resins. If your water naturally has a high pH (greater than 8), it's more likely to release a fish odor, and there's no good way to prevent this. Putting the resin through several regenerations and exhaustion cycles should reduce the smell.
Probably the worst-case scenario will occur when there is both high pH and chlorine. As chlorine degrades the tannin resin, the combination of by-products and high pH can create a smell that may never completely go away. It can also be a problem with water treated with chloramines.

Better Water Warehouse Iron Filter
Warranty Limited Lifetime
CALL 855-909-9544 for tannins

Sale Price  $1620.00

One drawback to treating tannins in water with anion resins is the potential for the system to develop a fishy odor. This is caused by trimethylamine (TMA), which is an organic compound used to make the resin. Under high pH conditions, the TMA (even in small concentrations) can produce this unpleasant smell, although it should dissipate relatively quickly. When the resin is made with the proper post-treatment, it will generally lose its odor within a regeneration or two. It should be noted that a macroporous anion resin will generally clean-up faster and easier than gel type anion resins. If your water naturally has a high pH (greater than 8), it's more likely to release a fish odor, and there's really no good way to prevent this. Putting the resin through several regenerations and exhaustion cycles should reduce the smell.

Probably the worst case scenario will occur when there is both high pH and chlorine. As chlorine degrades the tannin resin, the combination of by-products and high pH can create a smell that may never completely go away. It can also be a problem with water treated with chloramines with ammonia present.

Other Problems with Ion-Exchange Systems

The removal of tannins via anion exchange resins occurs through both an ion exchange and an absorption process.  Both are needed. Tannins are charged with a slightly negative charge. This causes them to be exchanged for chloride using the resin.  The same resin can absorb organics such as tannins. Regeneration is with Salt. Too many regenerations will reduce organic fouling. Brine the resin at approximately 10 lbs per cubic foot salt (NaCl). The resin must be regenerated often. Once the tannins are exchanged/absorbed onto the resin they will tend to migrate into the inner area of the resin bead. This makes it difficult to regenerate the tannins from the resin. The system must be regenerated every two to three days.  Longer regeneration intervals will promote organic fouling, whether the anion resin is acrylic or styrene-based.

Tannin resin can be mixed with softening resin, this reduces the amount of space required by the equipment and reduces the cost of the system. This type of design has done a wonderful job reducing tannins. However, during the regeneration, the salt will displace calcium from the cation resin and potentially alkalinity from the anion/tannin resin, which can promote Hardness particles. It can be seen as a white precipitate in the resin bed and a coating on the drain line. This can be very messy. Pressure drop through the system or a milky-white substance in the backwash water are indicators of precipitation. You can test for this by placing a small sample removed from the system and placed into some dilute hydrochloric acid (muriatic acid). The particle will bubble if calcium or hardness has appeared. The bubbling is due to the release of carbon dioxide. Cleaning methods will be discussed at the end of this article.

Anion resin has a lower density than cation resin. When an anion resin is backwashed it should not be backwashed at the same flow rate as a cation softening resin. The backwash flow rate of a cation is approximately five GPM/square foot (SF) of area. The anion should be backwashed at a flow rate of approximately two GPM/SF. If the tannin removal unit is a dual bed system (softening resin and tannin removal resin) the backwash must be adjusted or an upper screen or basket should be used in the valve. This modification will prevent resin loss. This is very important!

Tannin resin is frequently associated with a fishy odor. A residual by-product of anion resin is an amine. The amine coming from the resin is generally in very low concentrations, however, the odor threshold is approximately 40 parts per billion. Although the release of this amine is not a health issue, it is aesthetically displeasing. The fishy odor is more common when the water is chlorinated and has a high pH (>8). This is often the case when chloramines are used as a disinfectant. Ammonia and chlorine are mixed causing an environment that will break down resin and the ammonia will usually cause the pH to increase. It is better not to use any type of oxidant (chlorine, chloramine or peroxide, etc.) prior to the anion unit.

As water passes through a chloride-form anion resin, alkalinity will be lowered in the water. Alkalinity in this case is a buffering factor in water. As alkalinity is removed the pH of the water will decrease. The anion resin has a limited amount of capacity for alkalinity and should decrease the pH for only a short period of the service cycle. The chloride content of the treated water will increase. Watch the local water treatment regulations for chloride limits, if any. Chlorides have a secondary drinking water standard of 250 ppm. If the TDS levels exceed 800 ppm in the influent water a salty taste may be detected on the treated water. An RO will be required to reduce the TDS and salty taste at a drinking area.

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